The Gift of Therapy – A Book Review

Reading any Irvin D. Yalom book is therapeutic in itself. He writes boldly yet gently and fills every page with the insights of past philosophers and those of his own. Yalom founded existential psychotherapy, a stance holding that unconscious anxieties–most notably the “Four Ultimate Concerns” of death, isolation, meaninglessness, and freedom–impair our conscious thoughts and actions. This is not a standalone therapy, he claims, but a supplemental stance intending to make therapists and patients privy to existential issues. However, The Gift of Therapy‘s pages are not colored only with existential ideologies. No, this Continue reading “The Gift of Therapy – A Book Review”

Jung on The Therapist’s Dilemma

A couple weeks ago, I finished C.G. Jung’s essay The Undiscovered Self. I found it an impressive but not wholly convincing work–great food for thought but painfully hypothetical (Jung, of course, argues that is precisely how it should be). Still, I find myself revisiting a few ideas that really peaked my interest. One of such is his explanation of what I will call the “therapist’s dilemma.”

The Therapist’s Dilemma

“On one hand, he is equipped with the statistical truths of his scientific training, and on the other hand, he is faced with the task of treating a sick person who…requires individual understanding. The more schematic the treatment is, the more resistance it–quite rightly–calls up in the patient, and the more the cure is jeporadized.” – C.G. Jung, The Undiscovered Self (p. 7)

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